F.A.Q
Thursday, 14 May 2015 00:00

What does PHASA do for me as member?

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Some of the questions we also hear are ‘Why should I join?’ or ‘Why should I go to the AGM?’ There are, of course, many functions that PHASA performs as part of its service delivery to its members and their clients.

These functions relate to, among others, temporary firearm import permits, disciplinary matters, sourcing of member benefits, advertising opportunities, section 16(A) endorsements, registers, hunting opportunities, medal programmes, assistance at international shows, and interventions with permit and licensing problems.

PHASA is an important source of industry news and information for our members and their clients, and creates fantastic networking opportunities for them. Our meetings and AGM, in particular, are great opportunities for new professional hunters and outfitters to meet, and for the exchange of ideas and information.

These services and opportunities, important as they are, do not, however, describe the most important function performed by PHASA. Firstly, we need to understand PHASA’s mandate as set out in our Constitution. According to the mandate, PHASA’s aims include, among others, ‘to promote and safeguard the hunting profession in South Africa’ and ‘to promote and participate in the conservation of Africa’s natural resources’.

PHASA’s primary function is to look at the bigger picture and to do as much as we can to create a macro-environment within which the South African professional hunting industry will prosper and grow.

This environment must be sustainable, from a business perspective, in terms of our natural resources and in the socio-political arena. If we succeed in fulfilling this function, we are creating and maintaining a platform for our outfitters to grow their businesses. In turn, they will be in a position to employ more professional hunters and offer them more hunting days at better rates. This will help our young professional hunters to gain more experience, not only in hunting, but also in business, and will, in time, afford them the opportunity to become successful outfitters in their own right.

That is the very essence of what PHASA is doing for its members and, for that matter, for everyone involved in the professional hunting industry. PHASA works at it day and night!

How do we help to create and sustain this complex macro-environment, keeping in mind that there are certain factors that are simply beyond our control? Our involvement is multifaceted. We monitor and consider all aspects that have an impact on our industry, on an ongoing basis, and then decide on strategies for dealing with them. The input of our members, particularly through active involvement in our regional meetings and AGM, is critical to our success.

We continuously engage with all role-players to influence policies, legislation, decisions and opinions that affect our members and their livelihoods. These role-players include government at all levels, other hunting organisations, both here and all over the world, the media and opinion-makers, conservation bodies, leaders in the tourism industry, our communities, landowners and owners of wildlife, the animal rights movement and society at large.

We deal with important matters, such as transformation and social responsibility. To ignore or neglect these issues would be naïve and short-sighted. We work very hard to promote South Africa as a preferred hunting destination and to convince potential clients to hunt with our members.

The continued growth of our industry will help to ensure its relevance and significance in the eyes of our broader community. Without this growth, we would not survive in the long run.

Finally, we convey the message to society that our industry is, in fact, relevant, significant and responsible. Many people out there simply do not know this.

PHASA’s role here is critical, but for the association to be successful, we need to ensure that PHASA remains strong, credible and professional. For PHASA to meet these criteria, we need to focus on a number of matters: we have to continue to grow our membership and, very importantly, membership participation; and we need to debate issues and make decisions, often very difficult ones, in a manner that is constructive and solution-driven.

If PHASA loses sight of this primary function, our industry, and our livelihoods and wildlife will simply disappear over time.

Thursday, 14 May 2015 00:00

Why should I hunt with a PHASA member?

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An African safari is an expensive dream that, in many cases, comes along only once in a lifetime. Add peace of mind when you book your safari by hunting with a PHASA member. We have some of the finest African outfitters and professional hunters as our members, who are also, in most cases, the most active in the South African hunting industry.

Our members willingly adhere and subscribe to our strict Code of Conduct and are subject to our disciplinary oversight process. Each membership application is carefully scrutinised. Applicants with a known and recorded history of unethical behaviour are denied PHASA membership.

An increasing number of international clubs and shows recognise and promote the importance and value of booking with PHASA members when hunting in South Africa. For this reason, a significant number of the premier overseas shows now only allow PHASA members to exhibit and market South African hunts. (This arrangement does not apply to safari agents.) A number of exclusive reserve hunt tenders are, for the same reason, available to PHASA members only.

We keep our members up to date with the latest developments in the industry, including developments that may affect your safari, such as changes in legislation, firearm permit applications and airline policies.

PHASA also offers assistance and advice to all hunting tourists visiting South Africa who may encounter any difficulties before, during or even after their safari. We have extremely good relations with industry stakeholders, including the premier safari clubs abroad and our government, and have the capability to work with them to resolve any issues that visiting hunters may encounter.

PHASA and its loyal members are passionate about ensuring that your stay in South Africa is nothing less than phenomenal.
Our members are listed on our website and we would be happy to field enquiries from prospective clients on whether an outfitter is a member in good standing with PHASA.

Thursday, 14 May 2015 00:00

What does PHASA do for me?

Written by

Some of the questions we also hear are ‘Why should I join?’ or ‘Why should I go to the AGM?’ There are, of course, many functions that PHASA performs as part of its service delivery to its members and their clients.

These functions relate to, among others, temporary firearm import permits, disciplinary matters, sourcing of member benefits, advertising opportunities, section 16(A) endorsements, registers, hunting opportunities, medal programmes, assistance at international shows, and interventions with permit and licensing problems.

PHASA is an important source of industry news and information for our members and their clients, and creates fantastic networking opportunities for them. Our meetings and AGM, in particular, are great opportunities for new professional hunters and outfitters to meet, and for the exchange of ideas and information.

These services and opportunities, important as they are, do not, however, describe the most important function performed by PHASA. Firstly, we need to understand PHASA’s mandate as set out in our Constitution. According to the mandate, PHASA’s aims include, among others, ‘to promote and safeguard the hunting profession in South Africa’ and ‘to promote and participate in the conservation of Africa’s natural resources’.

PHASA’s primary function is to look at the bigger picture and to do as much as we can to create a macro-environment within which the South African professional hunting industry will prosper and grow.

This environment must be sustainable, from a business perspective, in terms of our natural resources and in the socio-political arena. If we succeed in fulfilling this function, we are creating and maintaining a platform for our outfitters to grow their businesses. In turn, they will be in a position to employ more professional hunters and offer them more hunting days at better rates. This will help our young professional hunters to gain more experience, not only in hunting, but also in business, and will, in time, afford them the opportunity to become successful outfitters in their own right.

That is the very essence of what PHASA is doing for its members and, for that matter, for everyone involved in the professional hunting industry. PHASA works at it day and night!

How do we help to create and sustain this complex macro-environment, keeping in mind that there are certain factors that are simply beyond our control? Our involvement is multifaceted. We monitor and consider all aspects that have an impact on our industry, on an ongoing basis, and then decide on strategies for dealing with them. The input of our members, particularly through active involvement in our regional meetings and AGM, is critical to our success.

We continuously engage with all role-players to influence policies, legislation, decisions and opinions that affect our members and their livelihoods. These role-players include government at all levels, other hunting organisations, both here and all over the world, the media and opinion-makers, conservation bodies, leaders in the tourism industry, our communities, landowners and owners of wildlife, the animal rights movement and society at large.

We deal with important matters, such as transformation and social responsibility. To ignore or neglect these issues would be naïve and short-sighted. We work very hard to promote South Africa as a preferred hunting destination and to convince potential clients to hunt with our members.

The continued growth of our industry will help to ensure its relevance and significance in the eyes of our broader community. Without this growth, we would not survive in the long run.

Finally, we convey the message to society that our industry is, in fact, relevant, significant and responsible. Many people out there simply do not know this.

PHASA’s role here is critical, but for the association to be successful, we need to ensure that PHASA remains strong, credible and professional. For PHASA to meet these criteria, we need to focus on a number of matters: we have to continue to grow our membership and, very importantly, membership participation; and we need to debate issues and make decisions, often very difficult ones, in a manner that is constructive and solution-driven.

If PHASA loses sight of this primary function, our industry, and our livelihoods and wildlife will simply disappear over time.

HUNTING IN SOUTH AFRICA
South Africa is the premier hunting destination in Africa. It has an unrivalled diversity of species – more than 45 major plains game species and all of the Big Five can be hunted in South Africa.
The South African professional hunting industry, focusing on international hunting tourism, is very strictly regulated.  Legislation stipulates that only a licensed hunting outfitter may market hunts to hunting clients.  A “client” is a person who is not normally resident in South Africa and who pays to hunt in South Africa.  The hunting outfitter must ensure that all written agreements are in place, that a licensed professional hunter will guide the client and that facilities that meet certain stipulated requirements are provided. The professional hunter and hunting outfitter must ensure that the necessary permits, licences and other documents are obtained so that the client may hunt legally and that the client is in possession thereof.
An international hunting tourist can therefore not just arrive in South Africa with the intention to hunt; it will be against the South African law and he will also not be able to export his trophies after such hunt.
Although there are national regulations in place, each of the nine South African provinces also has its own regulations and it is practically impossible to include a summary of all sets of legislation into one document. It is therefore extremely important that hunters ensure beforehand that the hunting outfitter arranging the hunt, has arranged the necessary permits for the hunt to take place in accordance with the provincial and national legislation. In addition to the above, certain species are also subjected to CITES permits.
With the necessary permits in place, South Africa offers various hunting opportunities including bird shooting and various hunting methods which would include bow hunting. Hunters interested in a potential hunt in South Africa, can approach the Professional Hunters’ Association of South Africa (www.phasa.co.za) for detailed information

USE OF SILENCERS

June 2014, PHASA enquired from provinces regarding the legal use of silencers for hunting. Summary below:


GAUTENG:  
Gauteng Ordinance 12 of 1983 does not prohibit the use of a silencer for hunting. It is therefore not illegal.

KZN:  
Legislation does not refer to silencers or sound suppressors. They are therefore not prohibited methods.

Northern Cape:
In the NCNCA 9/2009 a silencer is listed as a prohibited Hunting Method or Instrument BUT with the standard  provision that it can be used if  permitted by the landowner.  IN SHORT  -  it will be illegal to use on a public road but legal to use during a legal hunt the moment the landowners signs the written permission document

Free State:  
There is no legislation in place regarding the use of silencers in the Free State.  In short, it is not prohibited to make use of a silencer during a hunt.

Mpumalanga:
Current conservation legislation in Mpumalanga does not allow for the use of a suppressor/silencer without a permit, however we believe it is outdated and we will amend our Act and Regulations accordingly when the opportunity presents itself.

Mpumalanga Nature Conservation Act, Act 10 of 1998. Art. 11(f)    

Eastern Cape:
Not illegal to use a silencer on a rifle.

Limpopo:
LEMA do not prohibit the use of a silencer on a gun when hunting. Please read Art 38 in LEMA to get clarity.

It is advised that the hunter obtain permission/find out from the farm owner if he allows silencers on his property or not.



Tuesday, 17 June 2014 00:00

How do I apply for PHASA membership?

Written by

Follow this link to the relevant page on the PHASA website on Membership applications.

Permanent Exportation of firearms.

You have to follow the following steps:
1.    You can apply at your nearest DFO (designated firearms officer) for a permanent export permit.
-    You will need to complete a SAP520 form
-    Letter of country where you will be exporting to, stating that the firearm(s) may be imported into the country
-    Copy of ID/Passport documents
-    Firearm licence(s)
-    Competency Certificate or 2 Sets of fingerprints
DFO will capture and charge R140 per application (no matter how many firearms)
They will send it to CFR to issue – takes 4-6 weeks
CFR will send permit back to DFO

Afrikaans:

Permanente Uitvoer van Vuurwapens:

SAP520 ingevul vir Permante Uitvoer
Copy of ID/Passpoort
Copy of Lisensie
Copy of Competency – as hy nie competency het nie, 2 stelle vingerafdrukke
Land van Invoer se offisiele dokumente

Hy moet na die naaste Vuurwapen katoor by ñ polisiestasie gaan.
Die koste is R140 per aansoek (maak nie saak hoeveel vuurwapens nie)
Hulle sal dit capture en na CFR toe stuur wat dit sal proseseer.
Dit vat tussen 4-6 weke – hul sal dan die Uitvoer permit aan die vuurwapen kantoor terugstuur.

You have to follow the following steps:

1.    You need to be a citizen of SA; or have a permanent residence permit in SA. ( Both of these categories mean that you will be in possession of a Barr Coded Identity Book issued to you by our Department of Home Affairs

2.    You need to obtain a competency certificate for the firearm(s) through the SA Police before you can start with the import.

3.    After receiving the competency certificate, you can apply at your nearest DFO (designated firearms officer) for a permanent import permit.
-    You will need to complete a SAP520 form
-    Competency certificate
-    Letter of country from where you will be exporting, stating that the firearm(s) may leave the country
-    Motivation why you want to import the firearm(s)
-    Copy of ID/Passport documents

4.    Once your permanent import permit has been issued, you may bring in the firearm(s) and you will have 1 year to apply and obtain your licence for the firearm(s).

5.    You may store your firearm in your own safe if you have a permanent import permit.

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